5 Things I’ve Learned About Tough Decisions

Author: Aubrey
Go to Source

When my supervisor asked me how my week has been, I responded that “I’ve felt a little beat up this week. But I’m happy with how I’m handling it.” Being an administrator is full of making tough decisions, and often, those decisions generate negative feedback. Sometimes, like this week, a bunch of circumstances all converge, and it feels like I am hearing negative feedback about many different decisions and aspects of my job all at once.

“So what? It’s a part of the job,” you might say. It’s true, but the problem is that I can be an approval addict. I want everyone to like me, all of the time! I know it’s not healthy or possible, but it doesn’t stop me from feeling uncomfortable when somebody is unhappy with me. This year has yielded many, *ahm*, “opportunities” to practice getting over this tendency.

As our conversation continued, she asked me, “What’s different, that makes you you feel like you are handling it well?” While I can’t narrow it down to just one thing, here are five things I’ve learned about making tough decisions:

1. Root your decisions in data, and don’t be afraid to share your thought process.

This has been one of the biggest things for me to fall back on in my conversations. I don’t make decisions “just because”. There is a method to the madness! And when it is rooted in data, whether qualitative or quantitative, it is easier to articulate in a way that makes sense. Transparency and building understanding go a long way in helping people move forward after tough decisions.

2. Respond. Don’t put it off.

As I have heard from a wide variety of stakeholders about decisions that I have made and responded, some people have seemed genuinely surprised and grateful to get a response. It’s so tempting for me to put off calling back after hearing a voicemail or responding to an unhappy email, but when I do, it actually starts the conversation off on a good note, because it shows that I genuinely value their feedback and am willing to have a conversation.

3. K.I.S.S.

keep it simple stupid the office
Tough conversations can wander all over the place, which is okay, but in the end, I want to keep it simple. I need to be able to boil my decision down to a couple of simple talking points and keep returning to them. This takes me out of the space of having to respond to every emotion and accusation that comes up, and focuses on the core issue. I don’t mean to say that you shouldn’t listen and respond, or that you shouldn’t be open to changing your mind…but make sure you are staying rooted in the real issue at hand, and not wandering into side issues as you go.

4. Proactive communication > reactive communication

As much as possible, proactive communication can help soften and set the stage when decisions need to be made. Nobody likes feeling caught off-guard! Sometimes it even helps to know that a decision is coming, so people can prepare themselves for it.
On a similar note, if you think that things might escalate, it never hurts to give your boss a heads-up that you anticipate some possible pushback. At that point, you can make sure you are on the same page and both feel comfortable with the decision, as well as your response.

5. Trust yourself, but be open to others.

Ultimately, no matter how others feel about it, some decisions are mine to make. I have to be confident enough in myself to know that I am doing the best I can with what I have, and that is enough. Sometimes I’ll make mistakes, and that is okay too. This is where being open to others comes in. Prior to making a tough decision, soliciting feedback can keep you from missing certain angles and perspectives. After a decision has been made, if somebody points out something you haven’t thought of, be open to that. Weigh it against your reasoning, and see if it changes your thought process. Don’t be afraid to take more time to think about it if necessary. But in the end, if the decision is yours to make, the person you have to convince is yourself. Trust your instincts.

We all have decisions to make every day. What have you learned about making tough decisions? Share your tips and thoughts below!

Read more

5 Things I’ve Learned About Tough Decisions
Scroll to top